Tuesday, 5 July 2011

El Qusair

Egypt’s Gateway to the East
For thousands of years the coasts of Egypt have acted as the interface between the Nile Valley and the outside world, with points of entry and exit, lines of defence and sources of raw materials and food.
During the Pharaonic period ships like those depicted in Queen Hatshepsut’s temple at Deir el-Bahari, Luxor, put in at the natural harbours at the Wadi Gassus near safaga laden with exotic East African produce from Punt and at this time Qusair was called Thagho.
During this period the Pharaohs to give so much respect to the way between El Qusair and Upper Egypt and they used to call it Rohanou.


Marsa El Qusair - Satellite Image - NASA 2011 Google Earth
Old Balcony - Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
El Qusair Qadima ( Old Qusair) - Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
Masjed of Sidi Abd El Rehim - Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad


Qusair port was the only port receiving the Coffee from Yemen to Egypt before using the Suze Canal in 17th November 1869 AC. 
Under the Ptolemaic and Roman governments Egypt was at the centre of network of routes connecting Europe through Alexandria to The Red Sea, the Indian Ocean and beyond.
Ptolemaic used to name Qusair by Leukos Limen and Roman used to call it Poptus Albus and both names mean The White Port.
By the mid-sixteenth the Indian Ocean was controlled by the Portuguese. In 1540 Don Juan Castro, a Portuguese swashbuckler later to be appointed Governor of India sailed up the Red Sea firing his cannon at every coastal town on the way, including Qusair. This, together with the silting up of the harbour, caused the end of Qusair el-Qadima.
The new town, the present –day Qusair, became the main harbour linking Egypt with Arabia.

Masjed El Sheikh Al Farran - Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
Masjed El Sheikh Al Farran- Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
Sunrise on the Old Port - Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
The Church of Saint Mary - Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
English Building - Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
Original paints on the walls of Saint Mary - Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
Original paints on the walls of Saint Mary - Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
The Old Phosphate Company - Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
View of El Qusair from the Fort -  Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
View of El Qusair from the Fort - Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
Cannons of El Qusair Fort - Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
Sunrise - Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
Cannons of El Qusair Fort - Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
Cannons of El Qusair Fort - Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
Fishing Boats Building - Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
The Eastern Tower of El Qusair Fort - Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
Shipwreck in the Marsa El Qusair - Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
Sunrise - Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
In the Ottoman Period, Sultan Sleem was caring about the Qusair port and he is the one who build the Qusair fort as well as the Office of the Province (Qusair Police station Until 2008).
The Current Name El Qusair is belonged to the Islamic period as Qasr  القصرmean Fort. Qusair mean small fort, referred to the position of the town as it lay in very sensitive position as fort protecting the country.
In the period of the French Occupation in Egypt 1798AC, Napoleon was clever to see how Qusair port was really important  for Egyptian as they used to receive support by Arabia so he made decision to control it.

El Hamraween Port - Photo By/ Ahmed F.Gad
Marsa Abu Hamra - Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
El Zerib El Kbeer - Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
In 14th of August the British Army by the command of General Blankett  Have tried to attack El Qusair and to take it from French, they did not succeed, but they have tried again the day after got infantry battalion to the coast in a new bid, but failed again in the occupation of the town
Qusair el-Qadima, Located eight kilometres north of the modern town, was one of crucial ports in the Roman commercial empire from the first century BC until about AD300.
The city was the abandoned for nearly seven hundred years, but was revived when trade when the trade with India and Southeast Asia resumed in the Middle Ages.

Diving in El Qusair has become a popular activity for those who venture to this city in Egypt. In fact, so many people come for diving in Al Quseir that many of the hotels,  which are located on the beach and along the sea, offer their own diving centers. 

Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
Photo by/ Janusz Lach
Photo by/ Ahmed F.Gad
Photo by/ Tarek Ibrahim
Photo by/ Janusz Lach
Photo by/ Tarek Ibrahim
Photo by/ Janusz Lach
The popularity of diving in Al Quseir comes for the beautiful coral reefs. To protect the reefs, many hotels and diving centers take the time to follow various ecological measures to preserve each nature reserve and set high standards for marine conservation. In addition to diving, snorkeling is also an option with many reefs that are accessible right from the beach.
Although Al Quseir has become a common destination for those who love diving, the city has actually restricted the number of divers at any given time, which helps to reduce the amount of stress on the underwater environment. 


Furthermore, many of the hotels that offer diving in Al Quseir are also assisting the city in keeping visitors and establishments friendly to the environment by training staff members to think environmentally as they work or lead a tour. 
If you plan on diving in Al Quseir, you need not worry about bringing your own diving equipment. Equipment, including full gear, is available for rental from many of the different diving centers located along the beach.
You can also trust the Egyptian crew to help you every step of the way as you prepare for your jump, take your first dive, and finish up a day in an underwater paradise full of coral and a wealth of fish.

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